New Zealand

 
   Headlines
Lloyd Jones Awarded Creative New Zealand's Berlin Writers Residency Apr. 2007
Book Council Leader Resigns Apr. 2007
Borders Bookstores Expanding in New Zealand Apr. 2007
Writer admitted to Order of New Zealand Mar. 2007
2007 Buddle Findlay Sargeson Fellow Mar. 2007
New Generation Awards Nov. 2006
Leading Writers Honoured in Prime Minister's Awards for Literary Achievement Nov. 2006
Meridian Energy Katherine Mansfield Fellow 2007 Nov. 2006
2007 Robert Burns Fellow Nov. 2006
Montana New Zealand Book Awards July 2006
Queen's Birthday Honours June 2006
New Zealand Post Book Awards 2006 June 2006
Les Belles Etrangères May 2006
Major Publishers Move Distribution to Australia Apr. 2006
Margaret Mahy Wins Hans Christian Andersen Award 2006 Apr. 2006
Buddle Findlay Sargeson Fellowship Awarded for 2006 Feb. 2006
2005 Prime Minister's Awards for Literary Achievement Feb. 2006
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Lloyd Jones Awarded Creative New Zealand's Berlin Writers Residency
  Lloyd Jones, whose novel "Mister Pip" has won the South East Asia and South Pacific Region of the Commonwealth Writers' Prize Best Book Award 2007, will spend a year in Berlin from August 2007 as this year's recipient of the Creative New Zealand Berlin Writers' Residency. For more than 20 years, the versatile Wellington writer has had novels, short stories, essays and articles published in New Zealand and overseas. During the residency, he will work on a new novel as well as two non-fiction projects. The biennial Creative New Zealand Berlin Writers' Residency is the organisation's largest residency for writers. Established in 2000, it enables a New Zealand writer to focus on a writing project over a sustained period and respond to the life, people and culture of Berlin. It also provides professional development opportunities for the writer to build networks, appear at literary festivals, and give lectures and interviews.
(April 2007, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

Book Council Leader Resigns
  New Zealand Book Council Chief Executive Karen Ross has announced her resignation after ten years with the organisation.
  She said that her decision to leave had been difficult to make but she was delighted with the organisation's growth during her tenure, particularly the expansion of its programmes designed to bring books and readers together.
  "It has been an exciting and rewarding time to be involved," she said. "The organisation's capability and its position within the sector have gone from strength to strength."
  During Karen's time, the New Zealand Book Council has increased its staff from two to ten members. Its traditional programmes, Meet the Author and Writers in Schools, have expanded considerably, and the International Writers' Programme, WordSpace video conferencing and "the sky is the limit when you read" touring writer programme have all been established. The website and the Literary Pin-ups poster series have also been introduced.
(April 2007, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

Borders Bookstores Expanding in New Zealand
  Borders, the world's second-largest book chain, opened its third New Zealand store in the capital city of Wellington in March. The 2000-square-metre store will compete with some of New Zealand's best independent bookshops which are based in the capital.
  Borders will soon have four New Zealand stores operating with a new Auckland store joining the existing stores in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.
(April 2007, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

Writer admitted to Order of New Zealand
  Auckland writer Karl Stead has been admitted to the order of New Zealand.
  The Order of New Zealand is New Zealand's highest honour. It was instituted by Royal Warrant, dated 6 February 1987, "to recognise outstanding service to the Crown and people of New Zealand in a civil or military capacity."
  The Order comprises the Queen as Sovereign, and 'Ordinary', 'Additional' and 'Honorary' members. The ordinary membership is limited to twenty persons [20] living at any time.
  Professor C.K. Stead has been involved in New Zealand literature as a poet, novelist, critic and academic. He was an Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Auckland for 20 years until he retired to write full time.
  He has won several awards at the New Zealand Book Awards. His most recent literary work, "Mansfield", was a finalist for the 2005 Tasmania Pacific Fiction Prize and was commended in the 2005 Commonwealth Writers' Prize for the South-East Asia and South Pacific region.
  Stead won the Mansfield Fellowship in 1972. He was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire for services to literature.
(March 2007, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

2007 Buddle Findlay Sargeson Fellow
  Award-winning short story writer and best-selling novelist James George has been announced as this year's Buddle Findlay Sargeson Fellow.
  He will take up his year-long tenure at the Sargeson flat near Auckland University this month. In addition James George will receive a $40,000 grant while he holds the fellowship, allowing him to focus full time on his writing.
  This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Award and the 10th year of Buddle Findlay's sponsorship.
  George says that he will use the fellowship to complete the final draft and editing of his fourth novel Theme from an Imaginary Western and to undertake work on his fifth novel, Two Rivers. Both novels will be published by Huia Publishers.
  James George's second novel, Hummingbird, was a best seller in New Zealand and was a finalist in the Montana Book Awards in 2004 and the Tasmania-Pacific Fiction prize in 2005.
  The fellowship was established in 1987 to commemorate Frank Sargeson and provide assistance for New Zealand writers. Its aim is to offer outstanding writers the opportunity to write full time, free from financial pressure.
(March 2007, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

New Generation Awards
  Five New Zealand artists at the start of their careers have each been awarded $25,000 as recipients of the inaugural 2006 New Generation Awards.
  One of them is Poet Tze Ming Mok, A familiar name in the literary world, Aucklander Tze Ming Mok has had her poetry, fiction, reviews, features and opinions published in Landfall, JAAM, Sport, The Listener and the Sunday Star Times. Her short story Daily Special also appears in The Best New Zealand Fiction Volume 2 and her poem An Arabic Poetry Lesson in Jakarta was selected as one of the Best New Zealand poems in 2004. Tze Ming's Blog/Public Address Yellow Peril is hugely popular and she is currently working on a novel.
  The New Generation Awards are given to artists who have demonstrated excellence in the early stages of their careers. Five Awards of $25,000, donated by the Freemasons, will be presented by the Arts Foundation every two years to artists from any art form for them to invest in developing their careers, including creation of new work or development opportunities such as further education.
  'Having established the Laureate Awards for mid-career artists and the Icon Awards to honour senior artists, the Arts Foundation recognised the need to support and honour artists at the early stage of their careers,' said Ros Burdon, Arts Foundation Chairman.
  'The Foundation believes it's important to award and celebrate the young artists who have demonstrated richness, range, strength and depth for their stage of career and a huge potential to carry on as high achieving artists. These artists not only contribute significantly to New Zealand now, but are also the arts champions of tomorrow.'
(July 2006, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

Leading Writers Honoured in Prime Minister's Awards for Literary Achievement
  Three of New Zealand's leading writers - Patricia Grace, Vincent O'Sullivan and Judith Binney - have been honoured at the 2006 Prime Minister's Awards for Literary Achievement.
  Worth $60,000 each, the annual Prime Minister's Awards for Literary Achievement recognise writers who have made a significant contribution to New Zealand literature.
  Prime Minister Helen Clark presented the awards to Patricia Grace for fiction; Vincent O'Sullivan for poetry; and Judith Binney for non-fiction, at a ceremony at Parliament.
  'The work of these authors has added significantly to our cultural landscape and by doing so, has helped to define us as a nation,' Helen Clark said. 'Having a strong body of New Zealand literature reinforces and enhances our unique culture, and helps all of us to better understand the place in which we live.
  'Patricia Grace's work has played a key role in the emergence of Maori fiction in English. A writer of novels, short stories and children's fiction her work expresses Maori consciousness and values to a wide international audience.
  'Vincent O'Sullivan's poetry, which is what we are honouring him for tonight, goes to the heart of life's big themes - love, politics, philosophy, literature and history. He is one of the 12 New Zealand writers currently at the French literary festival Les Belles Etrangères and the invitation extended to us this year by that festival illustrates how highly regarded our writers are internationally.
  'Judith Binney's work plays a vital role in recording our history, with a focus on Maori communities. Her writing draws on oral histories and communal memories, and uses photographic sources as an integral part of the written historical discourse.
  'These three authors have won numerous awards which are an acknowledgement of how we as New Zealanders benefit from their work.'
(July 2006, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

Meridian Energy Katherine Mansfield Fellow 2007
  Christchurch-based playwright, screenplay writer, radio dramatist and novelist Stuart Hoar has been named as Meridian Energy Katherine Mansfield Fellow for 2007.
  His first stage play was Squatter (1987), and his most recent plays include Rutherford, The Face Maker and Bright Star, which was commissioned and produced by Circa Theatre in 2005.
  He has been Playwright in Residence at the Mercury Theatre (1988/89) and was awarded the Bruce Mason Award for Playwrights in 1988. In 1990 he was Literary Fellow at Auckland University and in 1993 he was Burns Fellow at the University of Otago. He has also had more than 30 radio plays produced and has written a number of opera libretti.
  The Meridian Energy Katherine Mansfield Memorial Fellowship is offered each year by The Winn Manson Menton Trust and Meridian Energy to enable a New Zealand writer to work at the Villa Isola Bella in Menton, France where Katherine Mansfield lived and wrote.
  Previous Katherine Mansfield Fellowship recipients include Maurice Gee, Lloyd Jones, Witi Ihimaera, Roger Hall, Maurice Shadbolt and the 2006 Fellow, Dame Fiona Kidman.
(July 2006, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

2007 Robert Burns Fellow
  Dunedin-based author Laurence Fearnley is to be the 2007 Robert Burns Fellow. She will use her tenure to complete the final book in her trilogy of novels set in Southland and Central Otago. The book, set in Invercargill, will deal with issues of solo motherhood and poverty.
  Laurence says she is delighted to receive the Fellowship. 'To join the amazing list of New Zealand writers who have held the fellowship is a fantastic honour.'
  Earlier this year, she was selected to spend a month at the Island of Residencies in Tasmania. In 2004, she was an Artists to the Antarctic Fellow where she gathered material for her most recently published novel, Degrees of Separation. Her second novel, Room, was shortlisted for the 2001 Montana New Zealand Book Awards.
  Laurence has published Delphine's Run (2003), Butler's Ringlet (2004) and Degrees of Separation (2006) with Penguin New Zealand.
  The Robert Burns Fellowship is New Zealand's premier literary residency. It was established in 1958 to commemorate the bicentenary of the birth of Robert Burns. The Fellowship aims to encourage imaginative New Zealand literature and to associate writers thereof with the University. Past fellows include Janet Frame, Roger Hall, Keri Hulme, James K. Baxter, Maurice Shadbolt, Michael King, Owen Marshall, Ruth Dallas and James Norcliffe.
(July 2006, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

Montana New Zealand Book Awards
  The Montana New Zealand Book Awards, this country's most celebrated awards for contemporary writing, were presented at a gala awards ceremony in Auckland on 24 July.
  Maurice Gee's novel, Blindsight won the Deutz Medal for Fiction or Poetry. The judges - Lawrence Jones, convenor, Linda Burgess and Bob Ross - described Gee's novel as a narrative tour de force, with a strong ending that makes the reader reinterpret everything that has gone before. "It is," they agreed, "a worthy addition to the oeuvre of this country's greatest living novelist."
  Pohutukawa & Rata:New Zealand's Iron-hearted Trees by Philip Simpson won the Montana Medal for Non Fiction. The judges considered this title to be a very valuable reference book, with a strong environmental message. Lawrence Jones went on to say that it is "very readable and gives a greater understanding of the unique nature of this group of native New Zealand flora. Clear text and well selected and presented illustrations make this an outstanding publication."
  The full list of winners is as follows:
  Deutz Medal for Fiction or Poetry and Fiction category winner: Blindsight by Maurice Gee (Penguin Books)
  Fiction Runners Up: Responsibility by Nigel Cox (Victoria University Press), and The Captive Wife by Fiona Kidman (Vintage)
  Poetry: Lifted by Bill Manhire (Victoria University Press)
  Montana Medal for Non Fiction and Environment category winner: Pohutukawa & Rata:New Zealand's Iron-hearted Trees by Philip Simpson (Te Papa Press)
  Biography: Dingle: Discovering the Sense in Adventure by Graeme Dingle (Craig Potton Publishing)
  History: Thrift to Fantasy: Home Textile Crafts of the 1930s - 1950s by Rosemary McLeod (HarperCollins Publishers)
  Reference & Anthology: Great Sporting Moments: The best of Sport magazine 1988 - 2004 edited by Damien Wilkins (Victoria University Press)
  Lifestyle & Contemporary Culture: How to Look at a Painting by Justin Paton (Awa Press)
  Illustrative: Contemporary New Zealand Photographers edited by Hannah Holm and Lara Strongman (Mountain View Publishing)
  Each category winner was presented with a prize of $5,000. The winners of the Deutz Medal and the Montana Medal were presented with an additional prize of $10,000. The runners-up in the Fiction category each received $2,500. The Readers' Choice Award carries a monetary prize worth $1,000 for each of this year's two winners.

  New Zealand Society of Authors Best First Book Awards:
  New Zealand Society of Authors E H McCormick Best First Book Award for Non Fiction - Pakeha and the Treaty: Why it's Our Treaty too by Patrick Snedden (Random House New Zealand).
  New Zealand Society of Authors Jessie Mackay Best First Book Award for Poetry - Dream Fish Floating by Karlo Mila (Huia Publishers).
  New Zealand Society of Authors Hubert Church Best First Book Award for Fiction - A Red Silk Sea by Gillian Ranstead (Penguin Books).

  A W Reed Award for Contribution to New Zealand Literature:
  The A W Reed Award for Contribution to New Zealand Literature was presented to poet Kevin Ireland. This award is presented biennially in recognition of an outstanding contribution to New Zealand literature and an involvement in activities which foster and promote literature to wider audiences.
  more → the official cite
(July 2006, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

Queen's Birthday Honours
  Publisher Christine Cole Catley was appointed Distinguished Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to literature. Others appointed as Officers of the New Zealand Order of Merit were: Lydia Wevers for services to literature; James Belich for services to historical research; Lieutenant Commander Allisteir Paterson for services to literature; Ren´e Taylor for services to literature and drama and James Traue for services to the library profession.
(June 2006, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

New Zealand Post Book Awards 2006
  The winners of the 10th annual New Zealand Post Book Awards 2006 (for children's books) were announced, at Parliament, on 17 May. The winning books are the judges' picks for the very best of those published in 2005.
  The winners were:
  New Zealand Post Book of the Year: Hunter by Joy Cowley
  Young Adult Fiction Winner: With Lots of Love from Georgia by Brigid Lowry
  Young Adult Fiction Honour Award: Kaitangata Twitch by Margaret Mahy
  Non Fiction Winner: Scarecrow Army by Leon Davidson
  Non Fiction Honour Award: Blue New Zealand by Glenys Stace
  Picture Book Winner: A Booming in the Night by Ben Brown & Helen Taylor
  Picture Book Honour Award: Haere - Farewell, Jack, Farewell by Tim Tipene & Huhana Smith
  Best First Book Award Winner: The Unknown Zone by Phil Smith
(June 2006, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

Les Belles Etrangères
  Les Belles Etrangères is a French literary festival, created in 1987 by the French Ministry of Culture and Communication to present foreign literature to French people, and organised by the Centre National du Livre (CNL, the French equivalent of the NZ Book Council).
  New Zealand is the guest country for 2006, and twelve New Zealand writers have been invited to France from 12 to 26 November 2006 to tour through the country in pairs or groups, meeting readers in bookshops, libraries, high schools and cultural centres in various cities. The New Zealand authors selected for this event are Jenny Bornholdt, Geoff Cush, Alan Duff, Sia Figiel, James George, Dylan Horrocks, Fiona Kidman, Elizabeth Knox, Owen Marshall, Vincent O'Sullivan, Chad Taylor and Albert Wendt. As part of the Belles Etrangères programme, the CNL will publish an anthology of previously unpublished works by these New Zealand guests, all translated into French. A documentary film is also planned (to be available on DVD) on each of the participating writers.
(May 2006, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

Major Publishers Move Distribution to Australia
  Two of New Zealand's biggest publishers and distributors, Hachette Livre and Penguin Books, have announced plans to relocate their New Zealand distribution to Australia later this year. Hachette [formerly Hodder Moa Beckett] will use the Alliance Distribution Services facility at Tuggerah, North of Sydney, while Penguin New Zealand will shift to Penguin Australia's new distribution centre at Scoresby, outside Melbourne.
(April 2006, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

Margaret Mahy Wins Hans Christian Andersen Award 2006
  New Zealand author Margaret Mahy has won the world's premier prize for children's writing, the Hans Christian Andersen Award. The announcement caps a remarkable year for Mahy, who recently celebrated her 70th birthday.
  The award tops off a remarkable period of recognition for Mahy. Already holding New Zealand's top civil award, the Order of New Zealand, she has in the last two years received the Prime Minister's Award for Fiction, a second honorary doctorate (University of Waikato) and the Phoenix Award from Canada's Children's Literature Association. She became an official New Zealand Arts Icon in 2005 and is twice shortlisted for the 2006 New Zealand Post Children's Book Awards (to be announced in May).
(April 2006, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

Buddle Findlay Sargeson Fellowship Awarded for 2006
  Award winning New Zealand writer Emily Perkins has been announced as this year's Buddle Findlay Sargeson Fellow. Perkins will take up her year-long tenure at the Sargeson flat in central Auckland in mid-February.
  The Buddle Findlay Sargeson Fellowship is a New Zealand national literary fellowship offered annually in partnership with The Frank Sargeson Trust. The fellowship provides the opportunity each year for an outstanding New Zealand writer(s) to write full time in residence in an apartment in central Auckland, with a monthly stipend.
  Buddle Findlay National Chairman, Sarah Roberts, says the award is about giving talented writers the freedom to focus on their creative activities. "For the first time this year, the decision was made to award one Fellowship which means that Emily will enjoy the benefits for the entire year." Perkins says she will use the space to work on her new book, Novel About My Wife, for Bloomsbury Publishing.
(February 2006, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)

2005 Prime Minister's Awards for Literary Achievement
  Three leading New Zealand writers were honoured at the 2005 Prime Minister's Awards for Literary Achievement, held in association with Creative New Zealand and announced at Premier House in Wellington.
  Worth $60,000 each, the annual Prime Minister's Awards for Literary Achievement recognise writers who have made a significant contribution to New Zealand literature. Prime Minister Helen Clark presented the awards to children's writer Margaret Mahy for fiction; Alistair Te Ariki Campbell for poetry; and Philip Temple for non-fiction.
(February 2006, Brian Phillips, APPREB correspondent)




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