Asia Pacific Cultural Centre for UNESCO (ACCU)
Asia-Pacific Database on Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH)

Home | Community Based Project
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1
Awaji Ningyo Joruri
Japan

Awaji Ningyo Joruri has a 500-year tradition and is one of Japan’s important national folk-cultural assets. It is believed that it was started in Osaka by performers of religious rites such as Bugaku (court dance and music). In Awaji Island, the technique of puppetry was then adopted. The shamisen (the Japanese three-stringed lute)...

more

1
Chichibu-Yatai-Bayashi
Japan

The Chichibu-Yatai-bayashi is instrumental music mainly played with taiko drums on dashi floats during the Chichibu-matsuri festival, a major annual festival. In 1979, the festival was designated as an important intangible folklore cultural asset under the name of the "Yatai events and Kagura (sacred music and dance) of Chichibu-matsuri"...

more

1
Kurokawa-Noh (Rosoku-Noh)
Japan

Kurokawa-Noh has been preserved and passed down for more than 500 years while keeping its own tradition and an ancient style in its repertoire and performances. The number of its performers is about 160, including Hayashi (musicians) and Kyogen players ranging from children to the elderly...

more

1
Nang Yai Performance
Thailand

Nang Yai, or big-size shadow puppet play, is one of the oldest forms of Thai classical outdoor entertainment since the 13th century. It comprises many different types of arts and the ancient Hindu Buddhist ritual practice organising many centuries ago...

more

1
Nekko Bangaku
Japan

Bangaku is a kind of kagura (Shinto musical dance) that has been passed down by yamabushi mountain ascetics worshipping in the mountains to people in the villages. The dance is performed to ward off evil, appease spirits and pray for good health and longer life. Bangaku is said to be classified as a style of Noh or Kyogen, but it does not purely belong to either of them...

more

1
Tanedori Festival
Japan

The Tanedori Festival has been celebrated on TaketomiIsland for 600 years. It lasts nine days and is characterised by seed-sowing rituals to pray for the prosperity of the community. On two designated days during the period, almost all the islanders participate in the festival. The day starts with an early-morning prayer at the shrine, followed by a welcome ceremony...

more

1
Nama Dance and Choir
South Africa

Deeply rooted in the tradition, their unique music and dance practised by the young and the old is for celebration purposes. The cultural make-up of the Richtersveld is as extraordinary as the botanical diversity of the region. It is also a place where culture increasingly transcends ethnic boundaries - an overall Richtersveld cultural identity is being shaped by people...

more

1
Kutiyattam
(Traditional Sanskrit Theatre)
India

Kutiyattam of Kerala is the oldest surviving Sanskrit theatre tradition of India and the most ancient continuously performed theatre tradition in the world. It embodies a unique representation of Sanskrit plays and a highly stylised and complex theatre language. In 2001 UNESCO declared Kutiyattam as a masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity...

more

 
Outline and Objectives of the Project more

Contest for Better Practices in Communities' Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) Revitalization

ACCU launched a community-based project from 2006-2009 and held the “1st and the 2nd Contest for Better Practices in Communities’ ICH Revitalisation”.  It drew many entries from communities which had been successful in revitalising their performing arts which were under threat of disappearance, or lacking in successors, in the UNESCO Member States.

The International Jury Meetings were organised in 2006 and 2008 in Japan, and solicited entries from communities worldwide, attended by experts including Mr. Rieks Smeets, the former director of the Intangible Heritage Section of UNESCO and Mr. Chérif M. Khaznadar, Former President of Maison des Cultures du Monde.

7 communities were awarded prizes in each of the two International Jury Meetings and invited to the workshops held in Japan in 2007 and 2009 to share their safeguarding experiences and to establish the ACCU’s ICH community network.

The 2nd workshop organised in Tokushima, Japan was a great success, inviting 22 representatives from the awarded communities and 4 experts to share safeguarding activities and experiences and discuss challenges for the future.  The representatives had a chance to observe the awarded Japanese communities, as well as to show off their performances to other participants.

Left: Mr. Smeets giving a speech, Right: Awarding the medal
 

Design of the ACCU Medal
Letters of the Japanese Kana alphabet were derived from Chinese characters in the process of assimilating them into the Japanese writing system and culture. The Kana letter "む" was created from the cursive style of the Chinese character "無", meaning a kind of negation, such as intangible. The medal's design is based on the shape of "む" pronounced as Mu, which is the first letter of Mukei Bunka Isan or Intangible Cultural Heritage.

 
 
 
Final Report of the 1st Workshop

Contents is available in PDF files

Final Report of the 1st Workshop

Contents is available in PDF files